Readers ask: How To Do The Kitchener Stitch In Knitting?

Is grafting the same as Kitchener Stitch?

It’s not magic! It’s called the Kitchener stitch. The Kitchener stitch (also known as “ grafting ”) involves weaving two live (still on the needle) edges together without creating a ridge — or even a break in the stitching.

Why is it called Kitchener Stitch?

During the First World War it is said that Herbert Kitchener, British Secretary of State for War, prompted the invention of a special graft for socks to prevent chafing. It came to be known as ‘the Kitchener Stitch ‘.

What is Kitchener stitch used for?

The kitchener stitch is a way to graft live stitches together creating a seamless join. It’s often used to close up the toes of socks or shoulder seams, (among other things).

What can I use instead of a tapestry needle?

I would use things like bobby pins, paper clips stretched out, or a safety pin. A good investment would be any sort of tapestry needle case. They look like little tubes.

How do you sew without a needle?

Fusible bonding tape is, in my opinion, the other most viable alternative to using a needle. Fusible bonding tape is useful in a range of situations, but really shines when it comes to connecting fabric and performing the role that a thread needle usually would.

What is graft stitch?

Grafting, also known as Kitchener stitch or weaving, joins two sets of stitches that are still on the needle (a.k.a. “live”) by using a tapestry needle threaded with yarn to create a row that looks like knit stitches between them.

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