Question: What Does Psso Mean In Knitting?

What is the right term of PSSO?

March 5, 2016 By Ashley Little. Learn all about psso (pass the slipped stitch over), a technique that can be used for binding off, decreasing, lace knitting and more. Psso means “pass the slipped stitch over.” This technique is most commonly part of a decrease in lace knitting.

What does pass over mean in knitting?

Psso refers to pass slipped stitch over, which makes a bound-off stitch in the middle of a row. Pass slipped stitch over is a decrease that appears in certain stitch patterns and in double decreases (decreasing 2 stitches at the same time). You can work it from the knit or purl side of your work.

Is SSK the same as PSSO?

As long as these two ‘ ssk ‘ and ‘k1 sl1 psso ‘ give the same result, why not use whichever comes easier to you? They are both left-leaning decreases, but they have a different look. As long as these two ‘ ssk ‘ and ‘k1 sl1 psso ‘ give the same result, why not use whichever comes easier to you?

Why do you slip stitch in knitting?

Slipping a stitch means it isn’t knitted that round. No extra yarn is added. So a slip stitch will naturally pull the yarn a little bit tighter from one row to the next. This results in a consistent tension and stitch size from row to row.

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What does PSSO stand for?

One example of a commonly used abbreviation in knitting is psso, which stands for pass slipped stitch over.

What is the difference between SSK and k2tog?

The Knit 2 Together ( k2tog ) is a right slanting decrease: Knit 2 stitches together as if they were one stitch knitting through both loops. The Slip, Slip, Knit ( ssk ) is a left slanting decrease: Slip the first stitch as if to knit.

What does P2Tog TBL mean in knitting?

“Purl 2 together through the back loop” (or P2Tog TBL ) is a rather counterintuitive way to decrease stitches on the purl side. To make the stitch: Approach the two stitches you want to purl together from the back and from left to right (rather than from right to left).

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