Question: How To Cast Knitting Stitches?

Do you cast on the first row of knitting?

The cast on itself is not counted, however, some cast on methods create both a cast on and a knitted row. For example, the most popular cast on, the long tail method, creates both a cast on and a knitted row. So in this case, you would count that as the first row.

What is the advantage of casting on thumb method?

The advantages of the thumb cast on: It creates a stretchy cast on and therefore is suitable for garments that need give e.g. sock and mitt cuffs (a revelation for me as hinted at in the introduction above!) It is simple to do in the middle of your knitting as you continue to work in the same direction.

What is knitted cast on method?

The knitted cast on is one of the simplest methods for casting stitches onto a needle. Unlike the long tail cast on, the knitted method uses a single working strand of yarn, and follows the same process as for knitting a plain stitch: you knit the stitch on the left hand needle, drawing a loop through.

Why do I add stitches when knitting?

The most common reasons that extra stitches occur are either accidental yarn overs and inadvertent knitting into space between stitches. An “accidental yarn over” occurs when you bring your yarn to the front of the work (as opposed to keeping it in the back).

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How tight should cast on stitches be?

When you are doing a long-tail cast -on and you snug up the stitches as you cast on, tug with your thumb, not your index finger. If you’ve cast on with good tension, you’ll be able to slide the stitches around on the needle, but they should not be so loose that they slide by themselves.

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